Military Pre 1946

Page 3 of 64
Sort by :
 Show:
Landcraft (2) M2/M3 American Half-Trac
46559MIL
Among the most successful armoured vehicles produced by American industry – known as the Arsenal of Democracy – during the Second World War were the M2 and M3 half-tracks. They served on every battlefront and were as recognizable as other famous American wartime vehicles like the Sherman and the Jeep, and around 40,000 were produced between 1941 and 1945. They were easy to assemble, operate and maintain, and their versatility allowed them to fulfil a variety of purposes. This volume in Pen & Sword’s LandCraft series traces the design, development and manufacturing history of the M2/M3 and describes its operational role within the Allied armies.
£14.99
More information
Add to basket

Landcraft (1) The Jeep-Second World
46511MIL
The Second World War Jeep was one of the most famous and influential military vehicles of all time, and over 600,000 were produced. It served with all the Allied forces during the war on every front and it has been the inspiration behind the design of light, versatile, rugged military and civilian vehicles ever since. In this, the first volume in Pen & Sword’s LandCraft series, Lance Cole traces the design, development and manufacturing history of the Jeep and describes its operational role within the Allied armies.
£14.99
More information
Add to basket

Tankcraft (18) Panther Tanks German
55902MIL
In late 1944 and 1945 the Panther tank played an important role in Germany’s desperate efforts to stem the Allied advance on the Western Front. The Panther, perhaps the best armoured vehicle produced by Germany during the Second World War, was a key element in the Wehrmacht’s defensive tactics, in rear guard actions and counter-attacks, and it took a prominent part in the last German offensive of the war, in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge.
£14.99
More information
Add to basket

German Tanks of World War II 1939-1945
47260MIL
Organised chronologically by type, German Tanks of World War II offers a highly illustrated guide to the main types of armoured fighting vehicles used by the German armed forces during the conflict. Ranging from heavy tanks to self-propelled guns, from light tanks to captured foreign tanks used by Germany, the book is an expert examination of the armoured fighting vehicles that were put into action in the invasions of Poland (Fall Weiss) in 1939, in France and the Low Countries (Fall Gelb) in 1940, in Fall Blau (Operation Braunschweig) on the Eastern Front, at Stalingrad in 1942-43, at the battles of Kursk and Kharkov in 1943, as well as in North Africa under Field Marshall Rommel, the Normandy campaign of 1944, and at the Battle of the Bulge in the Ardennes in 1944- 45. Tanks featured include light tanks such as Panzerkampfwagen I and II, medium tanks like Panzerkampfwagen III and IV Ausf E - the staples of the German war effort - and the Panzerkampfwagen KV - a captured Soviet KV-1.
£19.99
More information
Add to basket

D-DAY The Allied Invasion of Normandy
32304MIL
In the early hours of Tuesday, 6th June 1944, three divisions of paratrooper and glider forces descended on Normandy. Already assembling offshore was the largest seaborne invasion fleet in the history of the world, ready to unleash over 130,000 troops against Hitler's Atlantic Wall. More than 7,000 aircraft filled the skies. D-Day - and the liberation of Europe - had begun. Facing them were massive concrete strongpoints bristling with Nazi artillery, machine gun nests and pill boxes, untold miles of barbed wire, vast minefields and underwater obstructions designed to rip fragile landing craft apart. For the troops heading into the beaches and the paratroopers fighting to survive just a few miles inland, it would truly be `The Longest Day.' Featuring an exceptional selection of historic photographs as well as detailed battle maps, D-DAY provides a gripping account of the airborne actions and the beach assaults as well as revealing the top secret war fought by the Allies in the build up to the invasion.
£20.00
More information
Add to basket

The Falaise Pocket Normandy 1944
07274MIL
The battle of the Falaise Pocket, in August 1944, was the turning point in the Normandy campaign. By early August the German Army was in turmoil: while it was managing to hold back the Allies, the defense involved resources that could not be replaced, and the Allies ruled the skies above. In late July, American troops broke through the American lines and pushed south and east, while British and Canadian troops pushed south. Although unable to counter these offensives, Hitler refused to permit the commander Army Group B, Field Marshal von Kluge, to withdraw. Instead he was ordered to launch a counteroffensive at Mortain, the result being that the Germans ended up further into the Allied envelopment.
£19.99
More information
Add to basket

Camera On 11 SD.KFZ. 8 & SD.KFZ. 9
81883MIL
8 Schwerer Zugkraftwagen 12t - (heavy 12 ton half-track vehicle) -was a German half-track that saw widespread use in the war. Its main roles were as a prime mover for heavy towed guns such as the 21 cm Moerser 18, the 15 cm Kanone 18 and the 10.5 cm FlaK 38. Sd.Kfz. 9 Schwerer Zugkraftwagen 18t - (heavy 18 ton half-track vehicle) -was the Germans' heaviest half-track vehicle of any type built during the war years. Its main roles were as a prime mover for very heavy towed guns such as the 24 cm Kanone 3 and as a tank recovery vehicle.
£15.00
More information
Add to basket

Camera On 10 KFZ.1,2,3&4 Light Off
81876MIL
"The leichter gelandegangiger Personenkraftwagen, or l. gl. Einheits-Pkw - light off-road passenger cars - were manufactured by Stoewer, Hanomag and BMW from 1936 to early 1944. The superstructures were delivered by ten different companies and were identical from each manufacturer. Early versions had both 4-wheel drive and steering which later was dropped to just 4 wheel drive and front wheel steering. These off road cars were used by the German Army in four distinct versions with the designations Kfz.
£15.00
More information
Add to basket

Panther and Jagdpanther in Color
41628MIL
High quality resolution phots throughout.
£19.99
More information
Add to basket

British Painted Steel
42277MIL
Illustrating steel helmets of the British forces in WWII, many helmets being camouflage, netted and decaled with divisional insignia. The work by well known author Oliver Lock, is very much a pictorial study of the subject which until now has never been covered and a superb high resolution insight in to an area of collecting that has grown in recent years.
£39.99
More information
Add to basket

40M Nimrod Tank Destroyer and Armoured%2
83148MIL
The M40 Nimrod self-propelled armoured autocannon was designed and constructed by Hungarian engineers of Swedish origin. This armoured fighting vehicle was initially designed for anti-tank and anti-aircraft role, but from 1943 it was used against tanks and self-propelled guns only for self-defence. However, the Nimrod proved to be an excellent self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon and very effective as fire support for infantry units. It was a real Hungarian Flakpanzer of WW2.
£23.99
More information
Add to basket

Operation Diver: Guns, V1 Flying Bom
24755MIL
Operation Diver is the story of a battle: its action, people, landscapes, and remains. The battle was Anti-Aircraft Command's attempt to defeat the V1 flying-bomb, the first of Nazi Germany's `retribution' weapons, whose attacks dominated the home front in the final year of the Second World War. Beginning in the week of D-Day, the flying bomb battle lasted for nine months. In that time the men and women of AA Command became a massed, mobile army, shifting a vast carpet of guns to meet the V1's changing lines of attack. Beginning in Kent and Sussex, their journey took in the Thames Estuary, East Anglia and eventually the Yorkshire coast. Along with the RAF's fighter aircraft and the larger air defence system, their mission was to prevent a single flying bomb from reaching London, or any other British city.
£40.00
More information
Add to basket

From Leningrad to Narva: An Illustrate
83186MIL
In January 1944, the Red Army finally succeeded in putting to an end one of the most dramatic sieges in the history of warfare; that of Leningrad. Soviet spearheads quickly dislodged the Wehrmacht from the city, but once they reached the pre-war border with Estonia, they were stopped dead in their tracks by a very determined Axis resistance. There, at the river Narva, Germans, Estonians, and Waffen-SS volunteers and conscripts from all over Europe stood firm for several months against numerous Soviet attacks. By doing so, they were able to cripple the ambitious military and political plans of Joseph Stalin and to effectively postpone the Soviet liberation of the Baltic States for six months.
£25.99
More information
Add to basket

US Marine Corps Uniforms and Equipment%2
49048MIL
The United States Marine Corps was one of the phenomena of the Second World War. This epic story has been well documented in most respects - except one: the uniforms, insignia and personal equipment of the Marines who fought their way across the Pacific. Authoritative, illustrated reference works of this important aspect of World War II's physical history have been notoriously lacking. In this book, long-time collector and researcher Jim Moran fills the gap, with a systematic, detailed guide illustrated with more than 300 photographs, including some 200 close-ups of surviving items in private collections on both sides of the Atlantic.
£16.99
More information
Add to basket

WM468 Samochody Wehrmachtu Vol VI
94688MIL
This polish monograph contains an English summary and photo captions and covers the history of this subject.
£16.99
More information
Add to basket

German Self-Propelled Artillery Guns of
56955MIL
One towed artillery gun required a team of six horses and nine men. WW2 German engineers came up with the idea of mounting an artillery gun on top of a tank chassis. This new technology reduced the amount of resources required to deploy one artillery gun. Artillery self-propelled guns only needed a four or five man crew. They could also be made ready to fire more quickly. This book covers the development and use of this new weapon between 1939 and 1945. One type was successfully used in the invasion of France in May 1940. More were used on the Eastern Front against Soviet forces from 1941 until the end of the war in 1945. The 'Desert Fox', Ewin Rommel, needed artillery guns that could keep up with his Panzers in North Africa. Horses could not be used in the desert. He was sent 15 cm howitzers mounted on top of Panzer II tank chassis and captured French Army Lorraine 37L tracked armoured supply vehicles. Rommel's forces in Northern France were equipped with a variety of new artillery self-propelled guns.
£18.99
More information
Add to basket

Page 3 of 64